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Nancy Judd, Rise Above Plastics Cape, decommissioned straws, canvas, thread, 65 inches tall x 23 inches deep x 39 inches wide ©Nancy Judd
Exhibition
Jan 19, 2022
throughApr 22, 2022

Alterations. tailored solutions to climate change

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Due to the University's response to Covid-19, the University of Richmond Museums' are only open to the campus community at this time. 

Alterations. tailored solutions to climate change is on view in the Harnett Museum of Art, January 19, through April 22, 2022. The exhibition features 15 sculptural artworks by American artist Nancy Judd, that address topics including the ecological and social cost of our clothing, the food we consume, our connection to the land and sea, waste reduction, product packaging and waste, and the importance of bees in our world.

Nancy Judd (born 1968) takes on the challenge of making cast-off fashion elegant and inspiring people to look differently at waste and human impacts on our planet. Her utilization of fashion beckons the viewer to think about their own personal impact on our world and how people can make small changes to improve our environment. When asked about her work, Judd states, “I created Alterations to initiate conversations about how we live on the planet. An exhibition of fashion sculptures might seem like an unlikely place to think about climate change. However, I believe that creativity is needed to address the environmental and social impacts of capitalism and colonization.”

The exhibition addresses the crucial and persisting need to change how humans live on the earth by increasing people’s awareness and commitment to reversing climate change by taking certain actions. The exhibition is designed to reduce carbon in the atmosphere by pairing each sculpture with a science-based solution from Drawdown Ecochallenge, an environmental and social change digital platform inviting people from around the world to take action and create habits for reversing global warming. Participants choose actions, complete those actions, and track and share their progress using the online platform.

What is the main take-away for visitors? Judd states, “My greatest hope is that my work inspires people to use their power for the planet: use their power as voters to elect and pressure public officials to work for environmental social justice; and use their power as consumers to demand businesses build products that last, are packages without plastic, designed to be recycled, and use resources wisely. I hope Alterations seeds creative activism!”

Alterations was organized by Nancy Judd in conjunction with and circulated by GuestCurator Traveling Exhibitions. The exhibition at the Joel and Lila Harnett Museum of Art, University of Richmond Museums, is made possible in part with funds from the Louis S. Booth Arts Fund.